Rundown: Roads Crumbling

Street for All has a new feature! “Rundown” will present a news story and offer my take on its significance. Hope you guys enjoy!

via Los Angeles Daily News

L.A. has 2nd-Worst Roads in Nation

  • Nearly 2/3 of the major roads in the Los Angeles area are in poor condition
  • California contains 6/10 worst regions
  • San Jose is the worst region, with 64 percent of its major roadways in disrepair
  • Los Angeles ranked second-worst for automobile operating costs
  • Poor roads cost Angelenos $746 annually. The dollar amount figures in repairs and maintenance, increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

via local news queen

“I’m not advocating that we stop driving all together, but I do think that we deserve options for our mobility. We need to stop subsidizing our automobile culture at the expense of everything else.”

Rundown: Our infrastructure is crumbling. Cracked streets and potholes don’t just cause minor inconveniences, but damage our cars and cost us money in the form of increased maintenance, repairs, and fuel consumption. The only way to resolve this issue is to properly fund road maintenance and the only way to reasonably do that is to increase the gasoline tax. Now I know what your thinking, “gas is already f#$king expensive!!”  I couldn’t agree more. Back in 2008 when gas prices were at an all time high, I almost had a heart attack every time i spent $80 to fill up my gas tank, but the fact of the matter is, gasoline isn’t nearly expensive enough….

via USA Today

The gasoline tax accounts for the biggest piece of state transportation funding. CA’s current gasoline tax rate is 63.9 cpg (cents per gallon) (18.4 cpg fed tax included). The states current transportation investment deficit is $11 billion annually, but according to a study by TRIP, disrepaired roads cost Californian’s $40 billion ($746 per person) annually.

A solution? Raise the gas tax. Increasing the gas tax would increase revenue to fund transportation improvement like funding road & bridge repairs and transit projects. Higher gas prices would also decrease vehicle miles traveled (VMT), like we saw back in 2008. Higher fuel costs would de-incentivize the longstanding practice of moving further and further away from the inner city to buy deceitfully cheaper homes in the suburbs. When the aspects of fuel costs and “quality of life” are factored in, a home in the suburbs is not as cost effective as the price would suggest. Suburban development is sprawling in nature, favoring automobile usage over walking, biking, and transit. This leads to obesity, car dependency (and all the costs that go along with it: insurance, maintenance, parking, repairs), etc.

I’m not advocating that we stop driving all together, but I do think that we deserve options for our mobility. We need to stop subsidizing our automobile culture at the expense of everything else.


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Filed under Bicycle Infrastructure, Freeways, Gas Tax, Los Angeles, Metro, Mixed-Use, Rundown, San Jose, Traffic, Transit, Walkability

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